Top 10 Places to Visit in Israel

May 01, 2014  |  By Arik Barel

Dead Sea17933041-panoramic-view-over-the-dead-sea-israel

One of the most spectacular natural landscapes in the world, the Dead Sea is the world’s largest day spa, where people from all over the world throughout history have come to bask in its mineral rich mud and to float in its salty waters. In fact, the Dead Sea was actually recently nominated to be the 8th wonder of the World. Come take a dip and you’ll understand why.

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One of the last standing remnants of the Jewish Holy Temple destroyed almost 2000 years ago, yet the Western Wall”, a.k.a. the “Wailing Wall” or “Kotel” remains a living, breathing meeting point with the Divine, where Jews and non-Jews alike from around the world come to pray and to place notes for G-d in between its ancient stones. Ever experience transcendence? Now you can.

Israel Museum

The Israel Museum is home to a vast expanse of art and archeological works dating from prehistory to the present, including the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land antiquities in the world. Ever wanted to travel back in time? These corridors will take you on the journey of a lifetime. After you finish step outside into the art garden, counted among the finest outdoor sculpture settings of the 20th century.

Red Sea, Eilat

7388152-underwater-landscape-of-red-seaDiving enthusiasts come here from all around the world to snorkel, scuba and scuba at Eilat’s beautiful coral reefs. The clear and stunning blue sea and unique marine life, has over 1,200 different recorded underwater species, 10% of which are not found anywhere else in the world!

Yad Vashem

Yad Vashem is the largest Holocaust museum in the world, a large complex of monuments, exhibition halls, archives, and other resource centers where the ultimate expression of destruction, survival and redemption is on shocking display.

Masada

24220320-beautiful-sunrise-over-masada-fortress-in-judaean-desertThe ancient mountain fortress of Masada stands on an isolated rock plateau overlooking the Dead Sea. Masada is the symbol of Jewish martyrdom, where the remaining inhabitants committed mass suicide rather than surrender to their Roman enemies. You can still see the ramparts that the Romans built as part of their siege of Masada, and many other evocative ruins as well.

Mitzpe Ramon Crater

An amazing geological creation, this is the largest natural crater in the world, carved out over time by the forces of water and climate erosion. An amazing place to hike, bike or simply to just get an amazing view from the top of this breathtaking work of nature!

Caesarea Maritima

Caesarea is a national park on the Israeli coastline built over 2,000 years ago by Herod the Great, who dedicated the port to Caesar Augustus. Ruins from the Roman and Crusader periods are framed by stunning sea views, and the restored ancient amphitheater is now used for concerts in the summer.

The Baha’i Gardens

28922323-view-to-bahai-gardens-and-temple-in-haifa-north-israelThe Baha’i Gardens in Haifa are one of the most unique landscape displays in the world. Also known at the “hanging gardens”, they encompass a broad staircase of 19 terraces going up the northern slope of Mount Carmel. The central terrace features the gold-domed Shrine. The Baha’i Gardens are a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Tzfat

Set on a mountaintop in Northern Israel, the quaint city of Tzfat is known as the “City of Kabbalah,” due to its history as the region where contemporary Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism, developed. Today the small mountaintop town is, once again, a center of Jewish spirituality, while some of Israel’s best known artists and artisans make their homes in the city’s expanding Artist Quarter.

Category  : Jewish Art, Jewish History   

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